Kiswahili translation | Kiswahili translator | Kiswahili translation agency | German-Kiswahili | Kiswahili-German

Kiswahili translations by specialised Kiswahili translators (native speakers)

Our quality – your assurance

From order to delivery, we at ConText® translation agency use proprietary project management software based on ISO 9002, DIN 2345 and European industry organisation EUATC standards. All of our translations comply with the European EN 15038 standard in completeness and form.

Our specialist Kiswahili translators transfer all of the content while preserving the sense of the original and keeping the style appropriate to the translation’s target audience, giving you an accurate and authentic translation that looks like an original.

Modern technology also allows us to leverage previously verified sentences while keeping the technical terminology consistent in translation, giving our Kiswahili translations at ConText® a consistent writing style. Our translators integrate your terminology requirements, comments and corrections in databases for further use in every project.

Our areas of expertise: IT, business, law, IT, banking, construction, architecture, chemistry, biochemistry, medicine, pharmaceuticals, marketing, communication, advertising. Quality assurance included.

ConText®
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55118 Mainz
Germany

Tel.: +49 (6131) 55 434-0
Fax: +49 (6131) 55 434-20
E-mail: welcome(at)context-friends.de

Kiswahili – characteristics and spread

Kiswahili, also known as Swahili, is a Bantu language, and is the most widely used lingua franca of East Africa.

Kiswahili is the mother tongue of the Swahili tribe, who live along 1,500 km of coastline from southern Somalia to northern Mozambique, as well as a growing number of inhabitants of East Africa that grow up using this language. More than fifty million people speak Kiswahili, of whom only five to ten million are actual native speakers.

Kiswahili is an official language of Tanzania where it is maintained and promoted by the National Suahelirat, the second official language and most widely used lingua franca of Kenya, and has been one of the official languages of Uganda alongside English since 2005. The East African Community set the aim of promoting Kiswahili to replace English as imposed by British colonial rule.

Kiswahili is one of four national languages in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and is also spoken in Rwanda, Burundi, southern Somalia, the Comoros (including Mayotte), Mozambique and Malawi, and as a trading language (lingua franca) by around ninety million people. Kiswahili was adopted as a working language at the African Union Summit in July 2004.